Sidebar

Magazine menu

22
Thu, Feb

Dear Readers,

Americans, according to Brookings1, have been getting better educated in the last half-century, but class gaps in post-secondary educational attainment remain large. College drop-outs have average earnings levels and unemployment rates closer to that of high school graduates than college graduates; individuals born into families at the bottom of the income distribution who get a college degree have more upward mobility than those who do not; and parents pass on their educational advantage to the next generation. Most higher education models focus on getting students into college, but fewer focus on, more importantly, tracking the obtainment of a diploma. Without receiving a diploma, good intentioned individuals, organizations, and colleges often cause more HARM than good towards students who are left without a diploma but burdened with significant loans. 

The theory of disruptive innovation teaches us that the establishment needs to pay attention to the exceptional or “non-consumers” of the social mobility system who have developed alternative models to current practices of what is offered by those in power. As background, a disruptive innovation is an innovation that creates a new market and value network and eventually disrupts an existing market and value network, displacing established market leading firms, products, and alliances. The term was defined, and phenomenon analyzed, by Clayton M. Christensen and coworkers beginning in 19952. Since the early 2000s, "significant societal impact" has also been viewed as an aspect of disruptive innovation3. Disruptive innovations tend to be produced by outsiders and entrepreneurs, rather than existing market-leading companies. A disruptive process can take longer to develop than by the conventional approach and the risk associated with it is higher than the other more incremental or evolutionary forms of innovation.  

We have learned that the best correlation for individuals to earn family sustainable wages is either a higher education degree or a vocational certificate tied directly to a trade. Without a higher education degree or vocational certificate we know that individuals are usually “stuck” in the cycle of poverty, because even if they successfully increase their earning potential their public benefit subsidies decrease at the same rate keeping them poor.

At this time of heightened awareness in which we are operating in a global economy this edition of the Social Innovations Journal titled: SOCIAL INNOVATIONS TO ADVANCE SOCIAL MOBILITY MODELS IN URBAN CITIES, examines successful and innovative social mobility models in corporations, higher education, institutions, and social enterprises and offers strategies for them to scale or scale their impact.   

We especially encourage our readership to read the article College Rankings based upon Affordability, Graduation, Social Mobility, and Class Size Criteria by Michael Clark as it presents a new paradigm for how the average student in the United States should consider what college to attend. The college rankings by U.S. News and World Report (U.S. News), in our view, are not targeted to the average student. At best, these rankings contain irrelevant factors of concern; at worst, they perpetuate inequality and do more harm than good. If college administrations manage to outcomes driven by U.S. News, they cater to students and parents already sitting at the top of the economic ladder while eliminating opportunities for students lower on the ladder who seek social mobility through higher education. We encourage other large urban cities across the United States to develop and publish a similar college rankings system to better inform their residents of the best local opportunities for attaining opportunity through higher education.


Yours in Social Innovation,

Nicholas Torres
Tine Hansen-Turton
Co-Founders

 

1 www.brookings.edu

2 Bower, Joseph L. & Christensen, Clayton M. (1995)

3 Assink, Marnix (2006). "Inhibitors of disruptive innovation capability: a conceptual model". European Journal of Innovation Management. 9 (2): 215–233.


The Social Innovations Journal’s mission is to promote innovative ideas and incubate social innovation and thought leadership (i.e. teaching leaders “how” to think and not “what” to think) to spark a culture of innovation to create new models and systems change. The Social Innovations Journal (SIJ) takes a regional approach to sourcing social innovations and enterprises. Since 2008, SIJ has published hundreds of articles and convened thousands of people to discuss social innovations and social sector models at the local level. SIJ has a regional, national, and global following reaching millions of readers across the globe daily.

Dear Readers,

Despite U.S. health care expenditures surpassing $3.2 trillion dollars annually and accounting for 18 percent of the gross domestic product, millions of U.S. residents still do not receive accessible, affordable, and high quality care. The nation’s health care crisis is fraught with challenges, including massive, unsustainable costs and perpetuation of fragmented, ineffective models of health care delivery.

As the future structure of the United States health care system remains uncertain, the need for wide-ranging transformation is clear. Primed to lead this charge are the 3.5 million nurses registered in the United States, representing the largest segment of the nation’s health care workforce. Through their work in varied settings and at all professional levels, nurses possess an enormous reach and capacity to address crucial gaps in care across the U.S.

In 2010, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) issued a landmark report, the Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, calling for nurses to take the lead in health system transformation. The report offered recommendations to transform health care through nursing, so all Americans can have access to high quality care, with nurses contributing to the full extent of their education, training, and competencies. The resulting Campaign for Action -- a joint initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, AARP, and AARP Foundation -- challenged nurses to “lead and diffuse collaborative improve efforts” as part of an interprofessional initiative to redesign care. The IOM’s 2015 progress report further noted the need for interprofessional health care education to highlight “leadership, management, entrepreneurship, innovation, and other skills that will enable nurses to help ensure that the public receives accessible and quality health care.” 

Innovations in nursing expand beyond technological advancements to new process methods and creative cross-sector partnerships. This edition of the Social Innovations Journal, entitled “Social Innovations in Nursing: Taking the Lead to Transform Health Care,” examines the transformational work of nurses in the U.S. through a focus on the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. This edition is designed in partnership with the Pennsylvania Action Coalition, one of 51 state action coalitions charged with implementing the recommendations of the Future of Nursing report.

This edition describes innovations driven by nurses in various sectors. These examples demonstrate the power of new approaches spearheaded by nurses in some of the most critical issue areas facing health care today: the opioid epidemic, reducing preventable deaths, and community safety.


Sincerely,

Nicholas Torres
Tine Hansen-Turton
Co-Founders


The Social Innovations Journal’s mission is to promote innovative ideas and incubate social innovation and thought leadership (i.e. teaching leaders “how” to think and not “what” to think) to spark a culture of innovation to create new models and systems change. The Social Innovations Journal (SIJ) takes a regional approach to sourcing social innovations and enterprises. Since 2008, SIJ has published hundreds of articles and convened thousands of people to discuss social innovations and social sector models at the local level. SIJ has a regional, national, and global following reaching millions of readers across the globe daily.

Dear Readers,

We live in an ever expanding -- and yet, with technology -- ever shrinking global ecosystem in which the sharing, within and between regional ecosystems, of social innovations are of upmost importance. 

We are proud to have joined forces with the SOCIAL INNOVATION FORUM; Boston Mayor's Office of New Urban Mechanics; Harvard Kennedy School ASH CENTER for Democratic Governance and Innovation; MASSCHALLEGE; CITY AWAKE; SOCIAL VENTURE PARTNERS BOSTON, GREENLIGHT FUND BOSTON; and AMPLIFIED IMPACT to publish and distribute Boston’s SOCIAL INNOVATORS, SOCIAL ENTERPRISES, AND PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS.   

The Boston Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics best summarizes the focus of this edition that showcases Boston’s social innovations to the world.  

“From global leadership to national policy to state and local ideology, there is no doubt that change -- both beautiful and terrifying -- is imminent. It is in these moments where opportunity exists: opportunity to redirect the rhetoric, opportunity to slow the pace, opportunity to shift the paradigm. For those who see, seek, and seize these opportunities, the impact is often grand. And yet, because the entirety of impact is often felt long after implementation, it is difficult to recognize those movement makers, those insightful implementers, those do-ers as they make, implement, and do.

In this moment, the City of Boston itself swirls in change. Within the city, questions of stability and mobility, equity, safety, and quality of life pervade our homes, our workplaces, our streets, our schools, our people. Amidst these questions, our own Bostonians -- community leaders, entrepreneurs, students, parents, immigrants, academics, and artists -- are pursuing solutions. From community models that capitalize social capital into financial capital to research methods repurposed to learn about experiences and disparity to programs that empower Bostonians to demand and obtain the things they want and need to thrive, the City of Boston is rich with opportunity -- and those who seize the moment to create something new. As the City’s internal social innovation office, we at New Urban Mechanics relish, value, and take pride in working with and alongside this strong fabric of innovators, entrepreneurs, and experts.

This edition of the Social Innovation Journal highlights a fraction of the social innovations that keep the City of Boston on pace with change. From the viewpoints of the movement makers, the insightful implementers, and the do-ers themselves, you’ll learn about Boston’s challenges and opportunities. And you’ll also get to glimpse into the authors’ collective vision for Boston’s future.”

We want to thank the Bostion Edition Editorial Advisory Board for their work and contributions that led to this edition publication.  

Sarah Beaulieu: Greenlight Fund 
Darcy Brownell: SOCIAL VENTURE PARTNERS BOSTON
Tim Burke: Harvard Kennedy School ASH CENTER for Democratic Governance and Innovation
Danielle Curry: CITY AWAKE
Melissa Duggan: SOCIAL INNOVATION FORUM
Kiki Mills Johnston: MASS CHALLENGE
Justin Kang: CITY AWAKE
Kimberly Lucas: BOSTON MAYOR'S OFFICE OF NEW URBAN MECHANICS
Atyia Martin: City of Boston
Christina Marchand: Harvard Kennedy School ASH CENTER for Democratic Governance & Innovation
Andrea McGrath: AMPLIFIED IMPACT
Anna Trieschmann: SOCIAL INNOVATION FORUM

We hope this edition and its articles will inspire social innovators to continue sharing their ideas and inspiring new ideas across the globe. Join us on this journey to change the world in the belief that the potential for good ideas to inspire more good ideas cannot be underestimated and the value that entrepreneurs and innovators bring to local communities and regions across the nation needs to be harnessed and shared. Please take the time to read and share these articles which, ideally, will provide you with the inspiration, knowledge, and tools to become a civically-minded innovator to improve your local, regional, and/or national health, education, social mobility, and human services challenges to ensure dignity and respect for everyone.

 

Sincerely,

Nicholas Torres
Tine Hansen-Turton
Co-Founders


The Social Innovations Journal’s mission is to promote innovative ideas and incubate social innovation and thought leadership (i.e. teaching leaders “how” to think and not “what” to think) to spark a culture of innovation to create new models and systems change. The Social Innovations Journal (SIJ) takes a regional approach to sourcing social innovations and enterprises. Since 2008, SIJ has published hundreds of articles and convened thousands of people to discuss social innovations and social sector models at the local level. SIJ has a regional, national, and global following reaching millions of readers across the globe daily. 

 

This Edition titled Boston’s SOCIAL INNOVATORS, SOCIAL ENTERPRISES, AND PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS was made possible in partnership with Boston’s Social Sector Ecosystem.  THANK YOU!

Dear Readers,

Health and human services agencies along with their nonprofit and community partners in counties around the country have started to approach traditional long-standing societal challenges differently. They are capitalizing on public/private partnerships; breakthrough technologies; brokering unique cross-sector partnerships; blending funding sources, and applying family-centered and community-based approaches to find innovative solutions with the expectation that these will lead to efficiencies and better client outcomes. Ultimately, regional health and human services agencies, collectively, are shaping a new ecosystem across sectors and systems that will align services, integrate data systems, leverage technologies, and create system transformation. The American Public Health and Human Services Association said it best, “Health and human serving system leaders are discarding the old ways of doing business in favor of new approaches that are innovative, efficient, effective, and responsive to the needs and demands of a dynamic and rapidly changing society. We are shifting from a reactive and crisis-oriented services delivery model to one that focuses “upstream” and better enables all of us to live to our full potential and to more effectively identify and address root causes when we do encounter roadblocks along the way.”

The Social Innovations Journal in partnership with Bucks County Human Services, Woods Services, and Magellan Health Services is pleased to host the Fall 2017 edition and symposium that will examine successful and innovative models and partnerships within the Bucks County, PA Region as an example of how health and human services organizations are innovating across the country. This edition specifically explores new innovative models of care for Aging Populations; Mental and Behavioral Health; Children and Youth; Drug and Alcohol; and Physical and Developmental Disabilities. As you review the articles in this edition you will see tremendous steps towards engaging public/private partnerships that better serve the community for such key issues as the opioid epidemic (BCARES and BPAIR) and protecting our citizens (Ben’s Campaign and Crimes against older adults).  You will find how we are working with our Medicaid Managed Care Organization to be more data informed and outcomes oriented (Value Based Purchasing). You will also see stories on innovation and our team oriented model of practice through our internal Criminal Justice Advisory Board/Behavioral Health joint efforts (Mobile Crisis Engagement).  

We hope this edition will inform and inspire health and human services organizations as the potential of good ideas to inspire more good ideas cannot be underestimated.  

Sincerely,

Nicholas Torres
CEO/Publisher

Tine Hansen-Turton
Publisher
President & CEO of Woods Services 

Jonathan Rubin
Human Services Director
Buck's County 

Dear Readers,

Jean Monnet, the architect of European Unification said, “People of ambition fall into two groups: those who want to do something and those who want to be someone.” Many social entrepreneurs spend decades quietly, steadily, and unremittingly advancing their ideas, influencing people in small groups or one-on-one. Often, they become recognized only after years of working in relative obscurity. A person must have a very pure motivation to push an idea so steadily for so long with so little fanfare.  

This edition celebrates Greater Philadelphia Social Sector Leaders and Social Entrepreneurs as they often go without the recognition they deserve as they are too busy “doing” and creating change than promoting themselves. This edition recognizes these people as "the mavericks" who refuse to accept the status quo as they look at the world, are dissatisfied with what they see, and resolve to change it. They are both dreamers and doers; imagining a brighter future and setting about making that dream into a reality. They are true social entrepreneurs; innovators who are passionate and resourceful, who are prepared to take risks and who apply their energy, drive, and ambition to effecting social change...” 1

We hope this edition and its articles will inspire social innovators to continue sharing their ideas and inspiring new ideas across the globe. Join us on this journey to change the world in the belief that the potential for good ideas to inspire more good ideas cannot be underestimated and the value that entrepreneurs and innovators bring to local communities and regions across the nation needs to be harnessed and shared. Please take the time to read and share these articles which, ideally, will provide you with the inspiration, knowledge, and tools to become a civically-minded innovator to improve your local, regional, and/or national health, education, social mobility, and human services challenges to ensure dignity and respect for everyone.


Sincerely,

Nicholas Torres
Tine Hansen-Turton
Co-Founders

http://www.socialentrepreneurs.ie/pages/social-entrepreneurs.php


The Social Innovations Journal’s mission is to promote innovative ideas and incubate social innovation and thought leadership (i.e. teaching leaders “how” to think and not “what” to think) to spark a culture of innovation to create new models and systems change. The Social Innovations Journal (SIJ) takes a regional approach to sourcing social innovations and enterprises. Since 2008, SIJ has published hundreds of articles and convened thousands of people to discuss social innovations and social sector models at the local level. SIJ has a regional, national, and global following reaching millions of readers across the globe daily. 

Dear Readers,

We live in an ever expanding -- and yet, with technology -- ever shrinking global ecosystem in which civic engagement is of upmost importance. Now, more than ever, we need to unite the global social innovators to share their ideas with the knowledge that “good ideas inspire more good ideas.” Our global social sector innovators and entrepreneurs who are working to solve or “move the needle” on society’s problems are the catalysts that will propel society forward towards greater social good. These leaders represent a reminder that at the core of human life, we are here to ensure that all people not only have their basic needs met, but are able to thrive socially and economically, and through our collective advancements build socially-minded and civically-conscious communities of the future.

This edition focuses on the European Commission and represents the uniting synergies of three continents, North America, South America, and Europe. What we are learn through this edition is that our communities, cities, regions, states, and countries – although, operating under different circumstances -- all struggle with similar challenges in healthcare, education, social mobility, and human services and we are all working towards similar goals of ensuring human dignity and respect for all members of our respective societies. We are also learning that many of our social solutions are not unique and therefore there is an untapped potential in the sharing of ideas and their potential to improve societies across the globe.  

We want to thank the European Commission for their foresight and leadership to host the European Social Innovation Competition and source Europe’s BEST innovations. We are excited to partner with them and help share their knowledge, tools, and innovations with you and others around the globe.  As stated in this edition’s overview article, economic growth should not benefit the lucky few, but also provide opportunities for all members of society. We hope this edition and its articles, both in written and video format, will inspire business models that will enable everyone to equally seize the opportunities offered by technological change. 

Please take the time to read and share these articles and videos which, ideally, will provide you with the inspiration, knowledge, and tools to become a civically-minded innovator to improve your local, regional, and/or national health, education, social mobility, and human services challenges and to ensure dignity and respect for everyone.

Sincerely,

Nicholas Torres
Tine Hansen-Turton
Co-Founders

The Social Innovations Journal’s mission is to promote innovative ideas, incubate social innovation and thought leadership (i.e. teaching leaders “how” to think and not “what” to think) to spark a culture of innovation to create new models and systems change. The Social Innovations Journal (SIJ) takes a regional approach to sourcing social innovations and enterprises. Since 2008, SIJ has published hundreds of articles and convened thousands of people to discuss social innovations and social sector models at the local level. SIJ has a regional, national, and global following reaching millions of readers across the globe daily. 

 

Dear Readers,

America’s cities have long been gateways for immigrant arrivals. Even as increasing numbers of immigrants settle in the suburbs, urban areas continue to house the majority of the foreign-born in the United States. Many cities have developed rich networks of nonprofits, community groups and innovative programs to support immigrant and refugee communities. Many municipal governments recognize and appreciate the numerous benefits that immigrants bring to their cities, including cultural diversity, population growth, and economic development. Yet, they also struggle to address the challenges associated with integrating diverse, low-income, and limited English proficient (LEP) populations.

This edition of the Social Innovations Journal examines successful models for delivering integration services to immigrant and refugee communities, supporting immigrant leadership development, and promoting pro-immigrant policies, at the municipal level. Rather than take a sample of successful programs and policies from across the nation, we use a place-based approach that provides an in-depth examination of developments in one major U.S. city -- Philadelphia. The City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love has a longstanding tradition of serving as an immigrant gateway, and it has also experienced a recent upsurge in its immigrant population, which has inspired the creation of new nonprofit groups and collaborations to address the needs of newly immigrated communities. Philadelphia’s experiences with immigrant integration hold useful lessons for cities and smaller municipalities across the country. 

We want to thank Natasha Kelemen for bringing this topic to the attention of the Social Innovations Journal and curating the articles for this edition.  We hope you will read the below edition overview written by Natasha Kelemen that will inspire you to read all the published articles.  This edition profiles successful, innovative, and promising examples of immigrant integration and immigrant rights work in Philadelphia across economic development, health, legal services, education, civic engagement, and social justice.

We hope this edition will inform and inspire cities across the nation to share knowledge and resources as the potential of good ideas to inspire more good ideas cannot be underestimated. 

Sincerely,

Nicholas Torres, Tine Hansen-Turton, Co-Founders