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Tue, Aug

Dear Greater Chicago Social Innovator:

CHICAGO’S SOCIAL INNOVATIONS, ENTERPRISE, AND PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS edition and symposium will showcase Chicago’s most innovative solutions to solve society’s toughest problems. Across the globe and in Chicago, there has been a rapid rise globally in the number of social sector innovators and entrepreneurs who want to find innovative ways to solve or “move the needle” on society’s problems, and they are increasingly deploying the methods of business and private capital if that helps them to do so. They include people in the social sector who can now tap the markets for finance in addition to seeking grants from donors, and philanthropists who are willing to fund innovative ideas and businesses driven by social entrepreneurs and social sector organizations if they offer a greater likelihood of achieving the social impact they desire. The force capable of driving a social sector revolution is Chicago’s social innovation, enterprise, and partnerships that harness innovation, entrepreneurship, partnerships and capital to power social impact.

The Social Innovations Journal has joined forces with the Chicago Public Library, Forefront, The Law Offices of Marc J. Lane, and BYN Mellon to publish a Special Edition highlighting CHICAGO’S SOCIAL INNOVATIONS, ENTERPRISE, AND PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS. We will commemorate this publication with a symposium and launch event on APRIL 26, 2017 from 1:30 – 5:30 at the Chicago Public Library. This launch event will precede the Social Ventures Partners fast-pitch event from 6:00 – 8:00 at Uptake 600 W. Chicago Ave.

Click here to register!

Sincerely,

Nicholas Torres, Co-Founder/CEO
Tine Hansen-Turton, Co-Founder


Chicago's Social Innovations, Enterprise, and Public/Private Partnerships

April 26, 2017 1:30 - 5:30 (including reception)
Chicago Public Library

Agenda

1:30 PM - Networking

2:00 PM - Welcome
Tine Hansen-Turton and/or Nicholas Torres
Eric Weinheimer, Forefront
Brian Bannon, President, Chicago Public Library
Michael DiMedio, President, BNY Mellon Chicago and Midwest Region

Live Audience Poll

2:15 PM - Keynote
Marc Lane, Author, The Mission-Driven Venture: Business Solutions to the World's Most Vexing Social Problems

2:30 - 2:45 PM - Panel Keynote
Jesus "Chuy" Garcia, Commissioner for the 7th District on the Cook County Board

Panel (2:45 - 3:40)
Aviva Rosman, Ballot Ready
Jessica Droste Yagan, CEO, Impact Engine
Paul Sznewajs, Ingenuity
Jim Kales, Aspire Chicago
Christina Hachikian, Chicago Booth Social Enterprise Initiative

3:40 - 3:55 PM - Panel Keynote
Tim Frick, B Corporation and Mightybytes

Panel (3:55 - 4:50)
Megan Kashner, Founder & CEO of Benevolent
Brady Gott, Managing Director of Cleanslate Chicago
Eve Pytel, Delta Institute
Brenda Swartz, Concordia Place
Brandon and Amanda Neely, Overflow Coffee Bar
William W. Townes, Benefit Chicago

4:50 PM - Chicago Government Innovations
Kurt Summers, City of Chicago Treasurer

4:55 PM - Closing Remarks

5:00 PM - Reception and Networking

The Social Innovations Journal believes that the potential for good ideas to inspire more good ideas cannot be underestimated. The value that entrepreneurs and innovators bring to local communities and regions across the nation is often, to our collective societal detriment, overlooked.


Funders/Partners

May, 2017 - Regional Ecosystem Publication

PHOENIX/MINNESOTA SOCIAL INNOVATIONS, ENTERPRISE, AND PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS edition and launch event will showcase the Phoenix and/or Minnesota’s most innovative solutions to solve society’s toughest problems. Across the globe there has been a rapid rise globally in the number of social sector innovators and entrepreneurs who want to find innovative ways to solve or “move the needle” on society’s problems, and they are increasingly deploying the methods of business and private capital if that helps them to do so. They include people in the social sector who can now tap the markets for finance in addition to seeking grants from donors, and philanthropists who are willing to fund innovative ideas and businesses driven by social entrepreneurs and social sector organizations if they offer a greater likelihood of achieving the social impact they desire. The force capable of driving a social sector revolution is Los Angeles, Phoenix, and/or Minnesota’s social innovation, enterprise, and partnerships that harness innovation, entrepreneurship, partnerships and capital to power social impact.

July, 2017: Regional Ecosystem Publication

PHOENIX/MINNESOTA SOCIAL INNOVATIONS, ENTERPRISE, AND PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS edition and launch event will showcase the Phoenix and/or Minnesota’s most innovative solutions to solve society’s toughest problems. Across the globe there has been a rapid rise globally in the number of social sector innovators and entrepreneurs who want to find innovative ways to solve or “move the needle” on society’s problems, and they are increasingly deploying the methods of business and private capital if that helps them to do so. They include people in the social sector who can now tap the markets for finance in addition to seeking grants from donors, and philanthropists who are willing to fund innovative ideas and businesses driven by social entrepreneurs and social sector organizations if they offer a greater likelihood of achieving the social impact they desire. The force capable of driving a social sector revolution is  Phoenix and/or Minnesota’s social innovation, enterprise, and partnerships that harness innovation, entrepreneurship, partnerships and capital to power social impact.

September 19 - 28, 2017: Regional Ecosystem Publication

THE TRIANGLE’S SOCIAL INNOVATIONS, ENTERPRISE, AND PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS edition and launch event will showcase the Research Triangle’s most innovative solutions to solve society’s toughest problems. Across the globe there has been a rapid rise globally in the number of social sector innovators and entrepreneurs who want to find innovative ways to solve or “move the needle” on society’s problems, and they are increasingly deploying the methods of business and private capital if that helps them to do so. They include people in the social sector who can now tap the markets for finance in addition to seeking grants from donors, and philanthropists who are willing to fund innovative ideas and businesses driven by social entrepreneurs and social sector organizations if they offer a greater likelihood of achieving the social impact they desire. The force capable of driving a social sector revolution is The Research Triangle’s social innovation, enterprise, and partnerships that harness innovation, entrepreneurship, partnerships and capital to power social impact.

June 13, 2017: Regional Ecosystem Publication

BOGOTA’S SOCIAL INNOVATIONS, ENTERPRISE, AND PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS edition and symposium will showcase Bogota’s most innovative solutions to solve society’s toughest problems. Across the globe and in Bogota, there has been a rapid rise globally in the number of social sector innovators and entrepreneurs who want to find innovative ways to solve or “move the needle” on society’s problems, and they are increasingly deploying the methods of business and private capital if that helps them to do so. They include people in the social sector who can now tap the markets for finance in addition to seeking grants from donors, and philanthropists who are willing to fund innovative ideas and businesses driven by social entrepreneurs and social sector organizations if they offer a greater likelihood of achieving the social impact they desire. The force capable of driving a social sector revolution is Bogota’s social innovation, enterprise, and partnerships that harness innovation, entrepreneurship, partnerships and capital to power social impact.

September 25, 2017: Knowledge and Policy Lab Publication

SOCIAL INNOVATIONS TO ADDRESS IMMIGRANT NEEDS: HOW SOCIAL SECTOR LEADERS IN AMERICA’S CITIES CAN STRENGTHEN IMMIGRANT SERVICES AND POLICIES: America’s cities have long been a gateway for immigrant arrivals, and urban areas continue to house the majority of the foreign-born in the United States. As urban immigrant populations have grown through successive waves of immigrants, many cities have developed rich networks of nonprofits and community groups and innovative programs to support immigrant and refugee populations. Municipal governments have recognized and appreciated the many benefits that immigrants bring to their cities, including cultural diversity, population growth, and economic development. At the same time, these city governments have sometimes struggled to address challenges associated with integrating diverse, low-income, and limited English proficient (LEP) populations.

For years, the lack of comprehensive immigration reform at the federal level and inadequate, or in some cases, hostile policies toward immigrants by state governments, have left city governments and local nonprofits and community groups to shoulder much of the responsibility for addressing the needs of immigrant and refugee communities. Recent hardline anti-immigrant actions by the new Trump administration have heightened an already conflicted and politically charged national debate over immigration, escalating tensions between city, state and federal levels of government regarding immigrant policies. America’s cities are likely to remain focal points on immigration policy for the foreseeable future, and current tensions may intensify in the months to come with protracted legal battles and uncertainty around policy and government funding, and continued confusion and fear among immigrant and refugee communities. 

At this time of heightened debate regarding the policy landscape and funding environment for immigration services and advocacy, the Fall 2017 edition of the Social Innovations Journal, SOCIAL INNOVATIONS TO ADDRESS IMMIGRANT NEEDS: HOW SOCIAL SECTOR LEADERS IN AMERICA’S CITIES CAN STRENGTHEN IMMIGRANT SERVICES AND POLICIES, examines successful and innovative models for delivering integration services to immigrant and refugee communities and promoting pro-immigrant policies at the municipal level and beyond. Using a place-based approach that provides an in-depth examination of policies and programs in one major U.S. city – Philadelphia, this edition explores a diverse set of local innovations, including:

  • Discussing collective impact approaches to fundraising, grant making and programming to support immigrants
  • Promoting economic development through integration of skilled immigrant workers and financial services
  • Addressing a shared agenda and achieving policy success through short-term coalition-based organizing campaigns
  • Creating collaboration between refugee resettlement agencies and mainstream providers
  • Creating cross-sector partnerships to promote citizenship and civic engagement among new Americans
  • Harnessing the collective power of volunteer medical providers to provide community-based health care

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