Sidebar

Magazine menu

17
Sat, Aug

“Pioneering spirit should continue, not to conquer the planet...but rather to improve the quality of life.”

— Bertrand Piccard

We are thrilled to announce our latest edition, “The Network: Towards Unity for Health (TUFH) Social Accountability and Interprofessional Education.” We had the pleasure of again partnering with The Network: TUFH to bring you this special edition featuring global health pioneers working across sectors to improve the quality of life for citizens in ecosystems throughout regions around the world.

The Network curated this edition in an effort to highlight the pioneering work happening globally that is promoting and advancing social accountability and professional education. The Network believes that “Universal Access and Equitable Health Delivery can only be achieved when there is coordination, sharing, and capacity building between and within Academic Institutions, Health Systems, and Communities. By serving as the global connector between these three sectors (“The Network of Networks”) they are fostering the creation of new knowledge and collective solutions, building capacity within institutions and systems, and informing regional and global policy. The Network: TUFH aims to create a well-coordinated collective repository of innovations, best practices, and research that educates, builds capacity, and informs systems and policy coalitions and leaders toward rich discussion and debate in order to improve upon regional and global health policies” (https://thenetworktufh.org/about/).

In 2019, we see global trends emerging such as an increased focus on social and environmental determinants of health, dramatically rising health care costs, and increasing inequity in health outcomes. Layered with advances in data and information technology, these conditions have become more apparent to the public. We also are seeing a new era of social accountability. Social Accountability and Interprofessional Education have been identified as critical best practices to drive better health outcomes. However, there still exists a gap between systemic implementation and adoption and this blueprint for more equitable, sustainable, and holistic health care. We believe this edition is an important step in moving towards closing this gap to improved health care for all people.

We are excited to feature the talented practitioners of this “Network of Networks” who are building the bridge to the future through the health field and their articles that shed light on a promising path forward to improved health care and outcomes for people across the globe. We hope you too learn from these individuals operating at the cutting edge of global health and incorporate their best practices into your work, ideas, and policies that will help to shape our collective future and make improved care a reality for all people.


Yours in Social Innovation (and Accountability),

Mike Clark, President, Social Innovations Partners
Alescia M. Dingle, Managing Editor, Social Innovations Journal



Article Summaries 

Application of the Appreciative Inquiry Model for Managing Change towards Social Accountability of Medical Schools

Mohamed Elhassan Abdalla, MB.BS, MHPE, PhD, FAcadMed, College of Medicine/Medical Education Center, University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

Social Accountability of Medical Schools is facing a delay in turning from the conceptual phase into the real day-to-day work of medical schools. One of the reasons for this delay is the lack of training of faculty members on how to move towards social accountability. This article aims to introduce the appreciative model approach with its 5D-model as a feasible and positive change model to be used by faculty members and schools’ leadership to move social accountability forward.

 

Social Accountability as the Framework for The Moral Obligations of Health Institutions -- A Call to Action for an Academic Health Sciences Institution 

Dr. Alex Anawati, MD, CCFP-EM, ER Physician Health Sciences North, Assistant Faculty, Board of Directors and Global Health Coordinator NOSM

Social accountability in medicine is an inspiring concept for health professionals, health administrators, academics, policymakers, and for the public. To date, social accountability has largely been constrained to medical education, but its potential to positively disrupt other health institutions outside of medical schools cannot be underestimated. A call-to-action for the adaptation of a social accountability framework from medical education was issued to an Academic Health Sciences Institution (AHSI) in Northeastern Ontario, Canada. In response, the AHSI identified its need to “Be Socially Accountable” as a top priority.

 

Program Development for Global Citizenship Competences: Start in Your Heart

Geraldine Beaujean, Director SHE Collaborates, Maastricht University

Universities carry the responsibility to offer students exposure to society outside of the academic world to create a healthy world, and to use well, every power we have. Universities should contribute to “character building” during the years young adolescents spend a lot of time within these institutions by sending them into society, whether locally, regionally, globally, or a mix. Staff as well as students should be brave enough to look into their hearts and start every undertaking with an open mind to join forces with the community to work on and promote sustainable, inclusive solutions.

 

From Classrooms to Neighborhoods; A Reality for Which Students Must Be Prepared

Alejandro Avelino Bonilla

Recently graduated doctors might not be prepared to meet the needs of the community, this is a worldwide phenomenon and is related to two major objectives that educational institutions seek: Accreditation and Social Accountability. Both may have characteristics in common, but they are not equal and this disparity impacts the training of health students.

 

The Prospects of a Community-based Nutrition and Education Intervention During the Recovery Phase of a Disaster as Experienced on the Ground

Julieta B. Dorado, MS, Emily O. Rongavilla, MS; Joanne Jette L. Semilla; and Rowena V. Viajar, MS, Department of Science and Technology-Food and Nutrition Research Institute, Taguig City, Philippines

This article focuses on innovation as a nutrition intervention which will aid and protect vulnerable young children along with their mothers who are mostly women of reproductive age during the recovery phase of a crisis or disaster situation. This nutrition strategy combines complementary feeding of local-based complementary foods (for the children) and nutrition education (for their mothers or caregivers). The participation (involvement) of the children in nutrition intervention during the rehabilitation phase of a disaster is a contribution towards ensuring healthy survival and development within the age group of children 6 months to under 3 years of age. While the participation of mothers involves educating them in terms of food, nutrition and health which are approaches to empowering these women. The community or the temporary shelters where the affected families are located shall be the setting for implementation. Involvement of the community officials and community workers are needed to implement the innovation. The community workers shall be empowered through training on how to implement the intervention. The impact of the innovation may be gauged on the improvement or maintenance of the normal nutritional status of children participants while the effects of nutrition education among mothers could be measured in terms of knowledge gained and translation of knowledge to practice in their daily lives. 

 

Interprofessional Health Education Networks in Latin America and the Caribbean: Situation Analysis and Implementation Plans in 19 Countries

José Rodrigues Freire Filho, José Francisco García Gutiérrez, Silvia Helena De Bortoli Cassiani, and Fernando Antonio Menezes da Silva

In recent years, Interprofessional Education (IPE) has been introduced into policies in human resources for health (HRH) in the countries of the Region of the Americas, predominately in the United States and Canada, but also in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). The Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) has encouraged its Member States to adopt this approach and support policymakers in expanding its use. PAHO’s Strategy on Human Resources for Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage and its Plan of Action 2018-2023 encourage countries to promote the development of interprofessional teams in integrated health services networks using IPE, diversifying learning settings, and promoting collaborative practice. The objective of this article is to present an overview of national IPE plans developed with PAHO/WHO support in 19 countries of LAC during 2017-2019 along with its methods utilized.

 

Health Professions Education Programs Reorientation Towards Social Accountability: The ENACIER Model

Michel N Maboh, Aminkeng Z Leke, and Pauline B Nyenti

Cameroon is a nation that on average still has almost half of its population living in rural areas. Some schools that train health professionals use rural communities for community health internship placements. The most prevalent form of community internship uses a model where students go into the community, collect data on health indicators, and write a report which they submit in school for their grades. These communities expressed the desire to see some form of intervention as opposed to the data collection orientation that all the schools were using. To address this problem, the nursing curriculum was modified to increase the school’s social accountability to rural communities and expand leadership competencies in nursing students. The ENACIER model (empower, negotiate, assess, collaborate, intervention, evaluate and report) was developed and at its core was an intensive training using a 12-hour curriculum. It prepared undergraduate nursing students to leverage technology like point-of-care testing and local resources through community participation, to address one identified health-related problem during a 12-week internship. They will then work with community individuals and groups to solve this problem with the resources available within the community. Thus, with the students’ help, communities were able to prioritize their own problems and implement indigenous solutions within their own resources.

 

Interdisciplinary Teaching in Rural Settings to Enhance Multidisciplinary Team Care: The RIPL Effect

Sandra Mendel, Karen Beattie, Jane Thompson, Robyn Vines, Kam Wong, Jannine Bailey, Krista Cockrell, Buck Reed, Tim McCrossin, and Ross Wilson of Bathurst Rural Clinical School, School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Bathurst NSW Australia & School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, and Campbelltown NSW Australia

Our article describes a rural interprofessional learning (RIPL) program that has been integrated into the curriculum of the Bathurst Rural Clinical School, as well as our evaluation of the effectiveness of this type of teaching and the benefits we believe are gained from working in a team to deliver best health outcomes for rural Australia.

 

Building on Tradition to Promote Excellence in Social Accountability for Health Professions Education at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica

Toni-Ann Mundle, Nikolai Nunes, and Dr. Tomlin Paul (Dean of The Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of the West Indies)

Social accountability can be nurtured in health professionals’ education by redirecting the tenets of teaching, research, and outreach to address priority needs of the community. This article seeks to address the following question: Due to its great significance, how do students and staff of health professional schools further adapt to the diverse needs of patients, particularly those from rural and under-served areas?

 

Canadian Medical Schools Addressing Francophone Minority Needs

Aurel Schofield, C.M., CCMF, FCMF, Franco Doc Project Director, Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada; Danielle Barbeau-Rodrigue, Director, Francophone Affairs, Northern Ontario School of Medicine; and Philippe Leblanc, AFMC, Franco Doc Project Coordinator

The Francophone minorities across Canada have less access to French speaking health care services. These linguistic barriers have a negative impact on access to health care services, the experience and satisfaction of users, and on the equity of services offered. The Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada partnered with two community organizations, the Société Santé en Français and Médecin Francophone Canada to form a resource group to address this problem. Once the financial support from Health Canada was secured, a faculty-community liaison committee was established in each Anglophone medical school across Canada. They are composed of faculty members, medical students, and community health networks that engage in activities that benefit all partners. By placing the communities at the center of the initiative, this allows them to take an active part in educating learners and the medical schools about the Francophone minorities’ needs and realities. The project has had a positive impact thus far and its collaborative approach with community partners, learners, and medical faculties will lead to an increase in linguistic competencies of future clinicians and to the active offer of French-language services in Francophone minority communities

Dear Reader,

We are excited to bring you the third installment of the Social Innovations Journal’s new series on financing social impact -- “The Social Innovation Finance Series.” Across the globe there has been a rapid rise in the number of social sector innovators and entrepreneurs who want to find out-of-the-box ways to solve or “move the needle” on society’s problems, and they are increasingly deploying the methods of business and private capital to do so. Today’s social entrepreneurs are now tapping markets for finance, in addition to seeking grants from donors and philanthropists looking to support innovative ideas and businesses that offer an opportunity to deliver sustainable social impact. The power of finance supporting social innovation has the potential to spark a social sector revolution by harnessing the energy of social innovations, enterprises, and partnerships that drive innovation, entrepreneurship, and capital to bring the dream of social innovation and impact to life. 

Our special series will continue to reveal breakthrough initiatives within Social Mobility, Health, and Human Services while exploring new funding opportunities through philanthropy, impact investing, policy as investment, raising capital, and new financial instruments. We will continue to bring you the freshest social innovation fiscal models that include: Funding Systems Change; Health Care Bonds; Philanthropic Roundtable; Raising Capital; Regional Focus; Philanthropic Equity; Program Related Investments; and Social Impact Bonds.

Abraham Lincoln’s words, “The best way to predict the future is to create it,” inspire the collective energy of our third edition. We embark on the new frontier of untapped finance in philanthropy by exploring what the future holds. What will philanthropy look like in 2030? What issues will it have addressed during the previous decade? What new philanthropic strategies discussed today will become commonplace 10 years from now?

The answers to these questions remain elusive but following the work of today’s leaders, Changemakers, and field builders will provide us with a glimpse of the bright future ahead. Avery Tucker Fontaine, Head of Strategic Philanthropy at BNY Mellon Wealth Management, shares her insights of what the future of Philanthropy and Impact Investing hold in an article she penned and during an interview in this special edition – “The Social Innovation Finance Series Part III.” In this one-on-one interview with Social Innovations Partners President Mike Clark, Avery outlines a series of practical strategies across philanthropy and investing that can be adopted by individuals, foundations, and donor advised funds to unlock capital to impact the issues that matter most today and tomorrow.

Admittedly, innovative social entrepreneurs still have a difficult time securing funding sources to seed and scale their work. In this edition, we explore the potential for an additional two percent of assets through charitable foundations and donor advised funds. This would establish nearly $20 billion in additional support to fund cutting edge solutions to tackle society’s greatest challenges. 

Yet, unlocking even a fraction of these funds will take a new level of commitment, behavior change, and forward-thinking. Luckily, leaders like Avery Fontaine Tucker -- are stepping up to serve as practical guides on this exciting journey into the future of philanthropy funding social innovation. 

We hope that this edition helps you to see the bright future social innovation finance holds, and the pathway forward we are hoping to carve out with “The Social Innovation Finance Series." Together, we can better respond to some of the largest issues facing our communities through smart, sustainable solutions that can change the trajectory of our lives and world, for generations to come. 

 

Yours in innovation,

Nicholas Torres and Tine Hansen-Turton, Co-founders

Mike Clark, President and Alescia M. Dingle, Managing Editor

 

Dear Reader, 

“Fortune favors the audacious.” This sentiment from Erasmus serves as a common thread for the innovators featured in this edition, “The 2019 Greater Philadelphia Social Innovations Ecosystem,” subtitled as “Greater Philadelphia’s Innovations Inspiring the World Toward Social Impact.” These social entrepreneurs, innovators, and Changemakers all bring audacious approaches to solving some of our greatest social challenges here at home in Philadelphia, and breathe audacity into their work, organizations, and teams -- that inspire social impact work around the globe. If fortune favors the audacious, this edition of the Social Innovations Journal shines light on the bright future instore for Greater Philadelphia by featuring those leaders imagining and leading social innovations that are addressing our most intractable problems. 

As in years past, our first edition of the year dedicated to Greater Philadelphia celebrates the region’s social sector leaders who too often go without the recognition they deserve because their focus is instead on “doing” and creating change rather than promoting themselves. At the Social Innovations Journal, we are honored to have the opportunity to highlight these Changemakers through this edition and our annual recognition, The Greater Philadelphia Social Innovations Awards.  

Ten years ago, we started the Social Innovations Journal to share the stories and work of social innovators while building a community of the audacious, risk-takers that refuse to accept the status quo – and are selflessly dedicated to disrupting business as usual. We are beyond thrilled with how our community of mavericks has grown over the past decade, yet we are constantly exploring new ways to further engage, and become more interactive, with our readers and partners. Greater Philadelphia has built a social innovation ecosystem and we have been there every step of the way to support and provide a platform for the voices of the social impact community. Yet, we would be remiss if we didn’t ask, what do the next ten years look like? The innovators in this edition provide a glimpse of what the response to that question looks like. 

We hope this edition, along with its social innovators and leaders, will continue to inspire social impact work around Greater Philadelphia and across the globe. We hope that it continues to pave the way for the future of social innovation and the sharing of ideas, initiatives, and policies that will inspire and give birth to social innovations. Join us on this journey to change the world in our steadfast belief that “the potential for good ideas to inspire more good ideas cannot be underestimated.” We hope you too find immense value in the contributions social entrepreneurs and innovators bring to their local communities as the Journal works to harness this power through their stories that provide best practices for implementing new policies, tools for replicating programs, and lessons to reinvent and spawn new iterations. Please take the time to read and share these articles written and inspired by the social sector leaders who are truly changing Greater Philadelphia, and in turn, the world.

 

Yours in Social Innovation,

Nicholas Torres and Tine Hansen-Turton, co-founders

Mike Clark, President and Alescia M. Dingle, Managing Editor

Inglés | Español

Estimado Lector,  

En palabras de Sheryl Sandberg, COO de Facebook: “La Tecnología le pone un nombre y una cara, - una verdadera identidad – a todos aquellos que eran invisibles antes, y permite oír voces que de otra manera no podrían ser oídas.” 1 

Nuestras preguntas, catalizadores de esta edición, giran en torno a ¿cómo la tecnología permite a las voces ser oídas en el sector social y cómo el avance de la tecnología acelera el intercambio de buenas ideas? Estas preguntas son propias del Social Innovations Journal ya que estamos motivados por la creencia de que “el potencial de las buenas ideas para inspirar más buenas ideas no puede ser subestimado” y capitalizamos las herramientas tecnológicas para el intercambio de estas ideas de manera global.  

Con el fin de proporcionar un contexto, la tecnología digital continúa impulsando la innovación social en todo el mundo a través de la conectividad, nuevos sistemas de producción y nuevas formas de empleo. Al mismo tiempo, la tecnología digital también ha otorgado ciertas formas de trabajos prescindibles y los ha introducido en una era de incertidumbre y volatilidad.  Este contraste ha promovido el debate en torno a los beneficios y daños del avance tecnológico sobre la pasada década, y continuará incrementándose en los próximos años.  

El Social Innovations Journal le da protagonismo a América Latina para explorar estos contrastes. América Latina, una región caracterizada por sus contrastes, se enfrenta simultáneamente con el impacto negativo del mundo digitalizado y con la innovación en la tecnología digital para conducir el crecimiento económico y una mayor conectividad. América Latina está viendo la proliferación de laboratorios tecnológicos, incubadoras, programas universitarios para satisfacer la creciente demanda de productos digitales y la fuerza laboral capacitada necesaria para producirlos.  Tal como esta situación lo muestra, la región se está moviendo para ir al compás con el avance tecnológico e integrarlo con el ecosistema digital global. El sector social en América Latina, incluyendo Universidades y filántropos, ha producido modelo para que la región pueda integrar sus instituciones a esta nueva economía digital. Para cerrar la brecha de productividad entre los países de América Latina y los países desarrollados, es necesario incorporar la tecnología en el proceso productivo y articularla con los objetivos de desarrollo de los países. A pesar de que ha habido progresos en este aspecto, la única manera lograrlos es mediante la creación de sociedades más justas e inclusivas. Para ello, dos aspectos esenciales deberían ser considerados: Por un lado, un cambio cultural a través del cual se promueva una manera de pensar innovadora. Y, por otro lado, la colaboración entre todos los sectores de la sociedad.  

Los invitamos a leer primero el artículo introductorio que enmarca el tema de esta edición Innovación Social y Tecnología en América Latina escrito por Maria Alejandra Navas, Directora para América Latina  el cual los sumergirá más profundamente en el Ecosistema de la Tecnología en América Latina.  

En el Social Innovations Journal, estamos constantemente pendientes de cómo evolucionará el sector social en la próxima década. América Latina puede ser vista como una ventana a través de la cual se pueden observar las fuerzas que están moldeando nuestra economía global y cómo nuestras instituciones están enfrentando este cambio. Nos llena de emoción presentarles esta edición, con la colaboración y coordinación de nuestra colega, María Alejandra Navas, la Directora para América Latina del Social Innovations Journal.

Cordialmente,  

Nicholas Torres
Tine Hansen-Turton
Co-Fundadores  

1Patricia Morizio. Huffington Post. Febrero 2013. 

 

Social Innovation and Technology in Latin America

María Alejandra Navas, Latin America Director, Social Innovations Journal 

El artículo se enfoca en el análisis de las oportunidades y desafíos que surgen para la región en una economía digital y cómo cerrar la brecha de productividad entre los países de América Latina y los países desarrollados en una nueva era basada en la tecnología. 

 

INTERPRETA Foundation: The Use of Technology in Humanitarian Work

Bastián Díaz

The Foundation was born in 2016 in Santiago, Chili, as an answer to problems of the migrant communities in Chili, a growing issue in recent years. Moving away from assisting solutions such as delivering breakfasts or giving Spanish courses to Haitians, the Foundation prefers to position itself as an example of innovation by using tools of the corporate world and technology to solve problems related to immigration issues.   

 

Local Innovation Ecosystems to Strengthen Agroecology in Colombia: The Preliminary Case of LabCampesino of Tierra Libre’s Organization

Juan David Reina and Julián Ortiz

The use of digital technologies based on free hardware to contribute to the promotion of agroecology is in itself an innovative idea. However, it is the process of social owning of science, technology, and innovation in the rural sector and specially from the rural population, which creates disruptive conditions facing the traditional practices of technological transfer. In this sense, the article presents the progress and opportunities that are creating the Tierra Libre Project and, in particular, its initiative of LabCampesino that aims to strengthen a social innovation’s ecosystem and to promote agroecological practices in the rural population of the province of Sumapaz, Colombia. 

 

The Social Innovations Scientific Park

Paula Estefanía Castaño

The Minuto de Dios Organization (MDO), created by Father Rafael García-Herreros in the second half of the 20th century, has focused its efforts on service to society as the driving force of each of its entities; these, always seeking to respond to social problems in Colombia in various aspects such as health, housing, education, and others. And it is thanks to this approach, that in 2012 the work of the Social Innovation Science Park (SISP) begins as a commitment to social innovation responding to social needs. In this, we will take a closer look at how the SISP came about, what it is, how it works, and its impact.

 

MPZero: Sustainable, Affordable, and Clean Heating Available for Everyone

Ricardo Soto

Every winter, the air pollution caused by the combustion of biomass for residential heating is one of the biggest environmental problems suffered by the cities of South-Central Chile. Because the use of wood-burning stoves is the most affordable heating method, it remains today, despite its negative environmental implications, the most used tool by the population of Chile, despite causing serious health problems in the community, especially for children and the elderly. MPzero is a device for reducing emissions of fine particulate material, developed in Chile, which captures up to 97 percent of the emissions produced by this heating equipment, helping to keep the air clean and heating costs low for families who do not have access to heating methods that produce less pollutions. 

 

Leader’s Profile: Martha Leticia Silva

María Alejandra Navas

The leader of tomorrow is humble and authentic, curious and sensitive, flexible to learn new things and adapt easily to changes. It is someone who does not give up and versatile enough to consider differences as opportunities for growth,  

I met Martha Leticia Silva Flores during a social innovation event organized by the CISAI, Center of High Impact Social Innovation, in Jalisco, Mexico last June. She is its director and the impression that she made when we met, and what I was able to learn about her in just a few days’ time, convinced me to write about her as a leader of tomorrow

 

Connecting Points: Intelligence on Field to Solve Social Problems

Iván Yza

Facing the search for the democratization of the media and the need to access new technological tools to allow for the solution of problems related to transparency and accountability, most of which we know little to nothing about their functioning or how to put them in operation, Virk came into existence in 2014. Virk had a clear objective: to create tools that will allow organizations to innovate in issues like the systematization and documentation of information in low-cost and user-friendly, simple ways. This enabled Virk to become a channel for innovations and avoid restrictions that most users have facing new technologies, and to develop the first tools for reports and documentations in Mexico and Latin America.   

 

Dear Reader,

We are proud to bring you the second edition of the Social Innovations Journal’s new monthly edition on financing social impact -- “The Social Innovation Finance Series.” Across the globe there has been a rapid rise in the number of social sector innovators and entrepreneurs who want to find out-of-the-box ways to solve or “move the needle,” on society’s problems, and they are increasingly deploying the methods of business and private capital to do so. Today’s social entrepreneurs are now tapping markets for finance, in addition to seeking grants from donors and philanthropists willing to fund innovative ideas and businesses that offer a greater promise of delivering social impact. The power of finance supporting social innovation has the potential to spark a social sector revolution by harnessing the energy of the social innovations, enterprises, and partnerships that drive innovation, entrepreneurship, and capital to bring social impact to life. 

Our special series will continue to uncover breakthrough initiatives within Social Mobility, Health, and Human Services while exploring new funding opportunities through philanthropy, impact investing, policy as investment, raising capital, and new financial instruments. Through this series we will delve into evolving social innovation fiscal models including: Funding Systems Change; Health Care Bonds; Philanthropic Roundtable; Raising Capital; Regional Focus; Philanthropic Equity; Program Related Investments; and Social Impact Bonds.

The focus of the second installment of the Social Innovations Journal is innovative funding and finance within ophthalmology. Today, there are more than 4.24 million people living with vision impairment in the U.S. alone, and more than 10 million Americans facing loss of their vision due to retinal disease. Helen Keller famously said, “The only thing worse than being blind is having sight but no vision.” This edition highlights the innovative financing concept of Eye Bonds envisioned by Karen Shaw Petrou, a leading banking analyst featured in The Wall Street Journal. Shaw Petrou, the Managing Director of Federal Financial Analytics, Inc., takes listeners and readers alike, into the her innovative fiscal model that marries cutting edge medical researchers in the field with financial institutions and investors who can provide much needed funding. In an exciting audio interview with our organization president, Mike Clark, Shaw Petro offers a ray of hope to those living with impaired vision and blindness by sharing her formula that pushes fiscal institutions further into the social impact space with support of research that offers the promise of eradicating blindness worldwide within the next decade. Shaw Petrou demonstrates how the concept of Eye Bonds can lead to the potential development of a wider Bio Bonds market; a market that would address the financing of a variety of unprecedented medical advances.

We hope that this edition helps you to see the bright future social innovation finance holds, and the pathway forward we are hoping to carve out with “The Social Innovation Finance Series.” Together, we can better respond to some of the largest issues facing our communities through smart, sustainable solutions that can change the trajectory of our lives and world, for generations to come.

 

Yours in innovation,

Nicholas Torres and Tine Hansen-Turton, Co-founders

Mike Clark, President and Alescia M. Dingle, Managing Editor

Dear Reader,

We are proud to share that the Social Innovations Journal is introducing a new monthly edition on financing social innovation – “The Social Innovation Finance Series.” Across the globe there has been a rapid rise in the number of social sector innovators and entrepreneurs who want to find out-of-the-box ways to solve or “move the needle” on society’s problems, and they are increasingly deploying the methods of business and private capital to help them to do so. These Changemakers include people in the social sector who can now tap markets for finance, in addition to seeking grants from donors and philanthropists who are willing to fund innovative ideas and businesses if they offer a greater likelihood of achieving their desired social impact. The force of innovative finance and funding holds the potential to drive a social sector revolution by harnessing the energy of the social innovations, enterprises, and partnerships that propel forward innovation, entrepreneurship, and capital to power social impact. 

The focus of the newest series of the Social Innovations Journal is funding and finance in key areas within social innovation including Social Mobility, Health, and Human Services. The monthly series covers philanthropy, impact investing, policy as investment, raising capital, and new financial instruments. The rich array of topics of our new series includes: Funding Systems Change; Health Care Bonds; Philanthropic Roundtable; Raising Capital; Regional Focus; Philanthropic Equity; Program Related Investments; and Social Impact Bonds.

The economist Robert Shiller discusses the inherent beauty of finance in his Finance and the Good Society. We often think of many other things in life as beautiful, like a great work of art, an expansive landscape, but rarely finance. Yet, Shiller challenges us to expand our view of beauty to appreciate what lies beneath the surface. 

“Beyond the beauty of theory there is even more beauty in finance for what it creates. For finance is about human desires and human possibilities, and it facilitates all of the day to day activities that constitute our waking lives.” 

As Shiller states, there is an inherent beauty in finance and even more so in the use of finance as an instrument to address our most intractable societal problems. Shiller is pushing us to envision the use of finance and funding to imagine “what if” these resources could be leveraged to address our greatest social needs, and our hope is that our latest edition, "The Social Innovation Finance Series," will provide the framework to achieve this goal.

 

We are kicking off our inaugural edition of "The Social innovation Finance Series" with Odin Mühlenbein. Odin is an esteemed partner at Ashoka Germany and Ashoka Globalizer. He is recognized for his efforts in the development of systems change strategies through his work leading top social entrepreneurs as part of his role at Ashoka Globalizer. We are honored to have Odin's contributions in our first edition, where together we explore Odin's professional work through the articles he authored and learn from his expertise in finding, funding and fostering systems change initiatives through an in-depth, yet candid interview.

We hope that your journey into "The Social Innovation Finance Series" will bring you new insights from the articles and interview by and about the innovators at the helm of building the social innovation finance field. We believe that this series can serve as a catalyst to our coming together to advance innovative solutions in response to some of the largest issues facing communities across the globe.

Yours in innovation,

Nicholas Torres and Tine Hanson-Turton 

English | Spanish

Dear Reader, 

In the words of Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook: “Technology puts a name and a face -- a true identity -- to those that were invisible before and gives sound to voices that otherwise could not be heard.” 1 

Our questions, the catalyst for this edition, are how does technology give sound to voices in the social sector and does the advancement of technology accelerate the sharing of good ideas? These questions are personal to the Social Innovation Journal as we are driven by the belief that “the potential for good ideas to inspire more good ideas cannot be underestimated” and we work to capitalize on technology tools to share these ideas globally. 

To provide some context, digital technology continues to drive social innovation across the world through connectivity, new production systems, and new forms of employment. At the same time, digital technology also has rendered certain forms of labor expendable and has ushered in an era of uncertainty and volatility. This contrast has driven the debate around the benefits and harms of technological advancement over the past decade and will only grow louder in the coming decade. 

The Social Innovations Journal shines a spotlight on Latin America to explore this contrast. Latin America, a region of many contrasts itself, simultaneously deals with the negative impacts of a digitalized world, while innovating with digital technology to drive economic growth and greater connectivity. Latin America has seen a proliferation of technology labs, incubators, and university programs to meet the growing demand for digital products and the skilled workforce needed to deliver them. As this issue demonstrates, the region moves to keep pace with technological advancement and integrate into the global digital ecosystem. The social sector in Latin America, including universities and philanthropies, has produced models for the region to bring institutions into this new digital economy. To close the productivity gap between Latin America’s countries and the developed countries, it is required to incorporate technology in the productive process and articulate it with the development objectives of the countries. Inasmuch as there has been progress in this matter, the only way to accomplish it is by creating more fair and inclusive societies. For that, two essential aspects should be considered:  

On one hand, a cultural change through which the innovative way of thinking is promoted. And, on the other hand, collaboration between all sectors of society. 

We encourage you first to read the introductory and framing article titled “Social Innovation and Technology in Latin America” by María Alejandra Navas, Latin America Director that provides a deep dive into Latin American’s Technology ecosystem. 

At the Social Innovations Journal, we constantly have our eye on how the social sector will evolve and advance in the coming decade. Latin America serves as a window into the forces shaping our global economy and how our institutions are managing this change. We are excited to present this edition, in collaboration and coordination with our colleague, María Alejandra Navas, the Latin America Director of the Social Innovations Journal.

Sincerely, 

Nicholas Torres
Tine Hansen-Turton
Co-Founders 

1Patricia Morizio, Hufflington Post, February 2013

 

Social Innovation and Technology in Latin America

María Alejandra Navas, Latin America Director, Social Innovations Journal 

The article focuses on the analysis of opportunities and challenges arising from the digital economy in the region and how to close the productivity gap between Latin America’s countries and the developed countries in a new era based on technology.

 

INTERPRETA Foundation: The Use of Technology in Humanitarian Work

Bastián Díaz

The Foundation was born in 2016 in Santiago, Chili, as an answer to problems of the migrant communities in Chili, a growing issue in recent years. Moving away from assisting solutions such as delivering breakfasts or giving Spanish courses to Haitians, the Foundation prefers to position itself as an example of innovation by using tools of the corporate world and technology to solve problems related to immigration issues.   

 

Local Innovation Ecosystems to Strengthen Agroecology in Colombia: The Preliminary Case of LabCampesino of Tierra Libre’s Organization

Juan David Reina and Julián Ortiz

The use of digital technologies based on free hardware to contribute to the promotion of agroecology is in itself an innovative idea. However, it is the process of social owning of science, technology, and innovation in the rural sector and specially from the rural population, which creates disruptive conditions facing the traditional practices of technological transfer. In this sense, the article presents the progress and opportunities that are creating the Tierra Libre Project and, in particular, its initiative of LabCampesino that aims to strengthen a social innovation’s ecosystem and to promote agroecological practices in the rural population of the province of Sumapaz, Colombia. 

 

The Social Innovations Scientific Park

Paula Estefanía Castaño

The Minuto de Dios Organization (MDO), created by Father Rafael García-Herreros in the second half of the 20th century, has focused its efforts on service to society as the driving force of each of its entities; these, always seeking to respond to social problems in Colombia in various aspects such as health, housing, education, and others. And it is thanks to this approach, that in 2012 the work of the Social Innovation Science Park (SISP) begins as a commitment to social innovation responding to social needs. In this, we will take a closer look at how the SISP came about, what it is, how it works, and its impact.

 

MPZero: Sustainable, Affordable, and Clean Heating Available for Everyone

Ricardo Soto

Every winter, the air pollution caused by the combustion of biomass for residential heating is one of the biggest environmental problems suffered by the cities of South-Central Chile. Because the use of wood-burning stoves is the most affordable heating method, it remains today, despite its negative environmental implications, the most used tool by the population of Chile, despite causing serious health problems in the community, especially for children and the elderly. MPzero is a device for reducing emissions of fine particulate material, developed in Chile, which captures up to 97 percent of the emissions produced by this heating equipment, helping to keep the air clean and heating costs low for families who do not have access to heating methods that produce less pollutions. 

 

Leader’s Profile: Martha Leticia Silva

María Alejandra Navas

The leader of tomorrow is humble and authentic, curious and sensitive, flexible to learn new things and adapts easily to changes. They are someone who does not give up and they are versatile enough to consider differences as opportunities for growth.  

I met Martha Leticia Silva Flores during a social innovation event organized by CISAI, Center of High Impact Social Innovation, in Jalisco, Mexico last June. As the Center’s direct she made quite an impression when we met, and what I was able to learn about her in just a few days’ time convinced me to write about her as a leader of tomorrow.

 

Connecting Points: Intelligence on Field to Solve Social Problems

Iván Yza

Facing the search for the democratization of the media and the need to access new technological tools to allow for the solution of problems related to transparency and accountability, most of which we know little to nothing about their functioning or how to put them in operation, Virk came into existence in 2014. Virk had a clear objective: to create tools that will allow organizations to innovate in issues like the systematization and documentation of information in low-cost and user-friendly, simple ways. This enabled Virk to become a channel for innovations and avoid restrictions that most users have facing new technologies, and to develop the first tools for reports and documentations in Mexico and Latin America.   

More Articles ...